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Building a Data Warehouse

With Examples in SQL Server

By Vincent Rainardi

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Building a Data Warehouse: With Examples in SQL Server describes how to build a data warehouse completely from scratch and shows practical examples, using SQL Server, on how to do it.

Full Description

  • ISBN13: 978-1-59059-931-0
  • 523 Pages
  • User Level: Beginner to Advanced
  • Publication Date: December 26, 2007
  • Available eBook Formats: PDF
  • Print Book Price: $69.99
  • eBook Price: $48.99
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Full Description

Building a Data Warehouse: With Examples in SQL Server describes how to build a data warehouse completely from scratch and shows practical examples on how to do it. Author Vincent Rainardi also describes some practical issues he has experienced that developers are likely to encounter in their first data warehousing project, along with solutions and advice. The relational database management system (RDBMS) used in the examples is SQL Server; the version will not be an issue as long as the user has SQL Server 2005 or later.

The book is organized as follows. In the beginning of this book (chapters 1 through 6), you learn how to build a data warehouse, for example, defining the architecture, understanding the methodology, gathering the requirements, designing the data models, and creating the databases. Then in chapters 7 through 10, you learn how to populate the data warehouse, for example, extracting from source systems, loading the data stores, maintaining data quality, and utilizing the metadata. After you populate the data warehouse, in chapters 11 through 15, you explore how to present data to users using reports and multidimensional databases and how to use the data in the data warehouse for business intelligence, customer relationship management, and other purposes. Chapters 16 and 17 wrap up the book: After you have built your data warehouse, before it can be released to production, you need to test it thoroughly. After your application is in production, you need to understand how to administer data warehouse operation.

What you’ll learn

  • A detailed understanding of what it takes to build a data warehouse
  • The implementation code in SQL Server to build the data warehouse
  • Dimensional modeling, data extraction methods, data warehouse loading, populating dimension and fact tables, data quality, data warehouse architecture, and database design
  • Practical data warehousing applications such as business intelligence reports, analytics applications, and customer relationship management

Who this book is for

There are three audiences for the book. The first are the people who implement the data warehouse. This could be considered a field guide for them. The second is database users/admins who want to get a good understanding of what it would take to build a data warehouse. Finally, the third audience is managers who must make decisions about aspects of the data warehousing task before them and use the book to learn about these issues.

Source Code/Downloads

Downloads are available to accompany this book.

Your operating system can likely extract zipped downloads automatically, but you may require software such as WinZip for PC, or StuffIt on a Mac.

Errata

If you think that you've found an error in this book, please let us know about it. You will find any confirmed erratum below, so you can check if your concern has already been addressed.

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On page 201:
In the code that defines the data_flow table definition there are only four columns, id, name, LSET and CET. But in the code to insert values into the rows there are five columns id, name, status, LSET and CET. I can only guess at the data type for status since it is not given. It could be an int, tinyint or it could be bit or something I did not think of. Which is it supposed to be?