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Physics for Game Programmers

By Grant Palmer

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Physics for Game Programmers shows you how to infuse compelling and realistic action into game programming—even if you don't have a college-level physics background! All chapters include unique, challenging exercises, and the book also includes historical footnotes and interesting trivia.

Full Description

  • ISBN13: 978-1-59059-472-8
  • 472 Pages
  • User Level: Beginner to Advanced
  • Publication Date: April 19, 2005
  • Available eBook Formats: PDF
  • Print Book Price: $44.99
  • eBook Price: $31.99
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Full Description

Physics for Game Programmers shows you how to infuse compelling and realistic action into game programming even if you dont have a college-level physics background! Author Grant Palmer covers basic physics and mathematical models and then shows how to implement them, to simulate motion and behavior of cars, planes, projectiles, rockets, and boats.

This book is neither code heavy nor language specific, and all chapters include unique, challenging exercises for you to solve. This unique book also includes historical footnotes and interesting trivia. You’ll enjoy the conversational tone, and rest assured: all physics jargon will be properly explained.

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Errata

If you think that you've found an error in this book, please let us know about it. You will find any confirmed erratum below, so you can check if your concern has already been addressed.

* Required Fields

On page 380-381:
In Equation 13.9 on page 381 the values of case mass (mc) and explosives mass (me) have changed places. (Or the error is in Equation 13.8 on page 380)

The example states that the explosive mass is 0.185 and the metal casing mass is 0.210kg. According to Equation 13.8 it's mc/me wich would be 0.21/0.185, but in the example it says the other way around.