Beginning C

From Novice to Professional

4th Edition

By Ivor Horton

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With Beginning C: From Novice to Professional, Fourth Edition, you'll come to understand the fundamentals of the C language and learn how to program. You'll learn C from the first principles, using step-by-step working examples that you'll create and execute yourself. Soon you'll be writing real C programs!

Full Description

  • ISBN13: 978-1-59059-735-4
  • 640 Pages
  • User Level: Beginner to Advanced
  • Publication Date: October 19, 2006
  • Available eBook Formats: EPUB, MOBI, PDF
  • Print Book Price: $69.99
  • eBook Price: $48.99
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Full Description

With Beginning C: From Novice to Professional, Fourth Edition, you’ll come to understand the fundamentals of the C language and learn how to program. All you need is this book and any one of the widely available free or commercial C or C++ compilers, and you’ll soon be writing real C programs. You’ll learn C from the first principles, using step-by-step working examples that you’ll create and execute yourself.

This book will increase your programming expertise by guiding you through the development of fully working C applications that use what you've learned in a practical context. You’ll also be able to strike out on your own by trying the exercises included at the end of each chapter. Pick up a copy of this book by renowned author, Ivor Horton, because:

  • It is the only beginning-level book to cover the latest ANSI standard in C
  • Is approachable and aimed squarely at people new to C
  • Emphasizes writing code after the first chapter
  • Includes substantial examples relevant to intermediate users

Source Code/Downloads

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Errata

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On page 19:
In figure 1-4, the book refers to "void main". This is not a well defined entry point for a standard C program, as indicated by n1256.pdf section "5.1.2.2.1 Program startup". In other sections of the book "int main(void)" is used. I suggest returning int from the main function instead.

On page 59:

Step #5 on that page appears wrong and doesn't fit the example.

On page 202:

Exercise 5.3 has an error in the source code. If you enter these five numbers separated by spaces "1.99 2.99 3.99 4.99 5.99" it will output $1.99 $2.99 $3.99 $4.98 $5.98". The last two numbers are wrong; they are missing one cent.

On page 314:

const int pvalue = &value1; /* pointer to constant */
int const cpvalue = &value1; /* Constant pointer */