Pro Business Applications with Silverlight 5

2nd Edition

By Chris Anderson

This book guides you through the process of designing and developing enterprise-strength business applications in Silverlight 5 and C#.

Full Description

  • ISBN13: 978-1-4302-3500-2
  • 708 Pages
  • User Level: Intermediate to Advanced
  • Publication Date: February 14, 2012
  • Available eBook Formats: EPUB, MOBI, PDF
  • Print Book Price: $54.99
  • eBook Price: $38.99
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Full Description

Silverlight 5 has the potential to revolutionize the way we build business applications. With its flexibility, web deployment, cross-platform capabilities, rich .NET language support on the client, rich user interface control set, small runtime, and more, it comes close to the perfect platform on which to build business applications. It’s a very powerful technology, and despite its youth, it’s moving forward at a rapid pace and is gaining widespread popularity.

This book guides you through the process of designing and developing enterprise-strength business applications in Silverlight 5 and C#. You'll learn how to take advantage of the power of Silverlight to develop rich and robust business applications—from getting started to deployment, and everything in between.

In particular, this book will serve developers who want to learn how to design business applications. It will introduce the patterns you'll use, the issues you’ll face, and how to resolve them. Author Chris Anderson, who has been building line-of-business applications for years, demonstrates his expertise through a candid presentation of how to tackle real-life issues, rather than just avoiding them. Developers will benefit from his hard-won expertise through business application design patterns that he shares throughout the book.

With this book in hand, you will:

  • Create a fully-functional business application in Silverlight
  • Discover how to satisfy the general requirements that most business applications need
  • Develop a business application framework

What you’ll learn

  • How to structure your project to ensure a robust and maintainable application
  • How to create user interfaces with XAML and bind controls to data
  • How to communicate securely between the server and the client
  • How to view and maintain data within a Silverlight user interface
  • How to design unique user experiences and use advanced styling techniques
  • How to implement standard business application paradigms in Silverlight

Who this book is for

This book is for developers experienced in other .NET technologies, such as WinForms or ASP.NET, looking to translate their existing skills to developing business applications with Silverlight. Patterns and methodologies associated with building robust applications will be introduced and are not prerequisite knowledge.

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

  1. Getting Started with Silverlight
  2. An Introduction to XAML
  3. The Navigation Framework
  4. Exposing Data from the Server
  5. Consuming Data from the Server
  6. Implementing Summary Lists
  7. Building Data Entry Forms
  8. Securing Your Application
  9. Styling Your Application
  10. Advanced XAML
  11. Advanced Data Binding
  12. Creating Custom Controls
  13. The Model-View-View Model (MVVM) Design Pattern
  14. An Introduction to Prism and MEF
  15. Printing and Reporting
  16. Out of Browser Mode and Interacting with the Operating System
  17. Application Deployment
Source Code/Downloads

Downloads are available to accompany this book.

Your operating system can likely extract zipped downloads automatically, but you may require software such as WinZip for PC, or StuffIt on a Mac.

Errata

Please Login to submit errata.

On page 313:
*Please see the author-submitted errata below.*

Author Comment:

Section: Part 2: Implementing Security Restrictions

Point: #3: You also need to add the following using statement to the top of the GTManagerRoleAttribute file:

using System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations;

On page 320:

*Please see the author-submitted errata below.*


Author Comment:

Section: Workshop: Practicing with Client-Side Security

Point: #3: You also need to add the following using statement to the top of the MainPage.xaml.cs file:

using System.ServiceModel.DomainServices.Client.ApplicationServices;

Point: #7: The note at the end of this point mentions a UserRegistrationData class. The correct name for this class is actually RegistrationData. More complete details on removing the need for a security question and answer can be found in a note on page 310.

On page 363:

*Please see the author-submitted errata below.*

Author Comment:

Section: Workshop: Implementing the Custom Markup Extension (Part 1: Creating the Custom Markup Extension)

Point: #5: There is a trailing semi-colon on this line that doesn’t belong. It should simple read:
public string Path { get; set; }

Point: #7: Unfortunately, this was a cut and paste nightmare. The code in the class should all be within the ProvideValue override method, as explained in the previous steps of the workshop. If you follow the workshop steps you will be fine, but simply copying and pasting this code listing into your own project will not work. Therefore, either follow the steps laid out in the workshop one by one, or download the source code accompanying this chapter where you will find the complete source.



On page 472:

*Please see the author-submitted errata below.*

Author Comment:

Section: Workshop: Creating the LoginViewModel ViewModel Clas

Point: #4: In order to be able to create a DelegateCommand object in your LoginViewModel class, you will need to add the following using statement to the top of the file:

using SimpleMVVM;


On page 517-518:

*Please see the author-submitted errata below.*

Author Comment:

Section: Workshop: Configuring Catalogs and Downloading Modules

Point: #9: In order to be able to reference the IPersonPart interface in your Module1 class, you will need to add the following using statement to the top of the file:

using Chapter14Sample;


On page 539:

*Please see the author-submitted errata below.*

Author Comment:

Section: Workshop: Creating a Report Renderer

Point: #1: It was mentioned earlier in the chapter, but not explicitly specified as a workshop step that you need to add a reference to Microsoft.Reporting.WebForms.dll to your Web project. It is required by the BaseReportRenderer class that you’re using in this step.


On page 550:

*Please see the author-submitted errata below.*

Author Comment:

Section: Workshop: Using the HtmlViewer Control

Point: #5: The namespace prefix created in point #4 was named my:, but this point is expecting it to be layout:. Change one or the other so that they are the same.